Lunch Seminar: Renewable Energy and Native American Communities: Opportunities and Constraints

Date: 
Wednesday, October 14, 2009 - 5:00am - 6:00am

Lunch Seminar: Renewable Energy and Native American Communities: Opportunities and Constraints. Brandon Glenn is a Master student of the Energy and Resources Group.

Wednesday, Noon-1:00 p.m., October 14.
323 Barrows Hall (ERG Reading Room)
University of California, Berkeley

This is part of the weekly RAEL lunch seminar series

Native American Tribes in the contiguous United States, comprise one percent of the population, retain two percent of the land, along with 6% of the nation's oil and gas, 30% of its strippable coal, and 40% of the country’s uranium (CRS, 2002).

Over the years, various programs have operated under the guise of the environmentally sustainable economic development of Indian Country through the application of renewable energy generation and increased energy efficiency, with varying degrees of success. Based on RAEL’s analysis this past summer, it is expected that in the spring of 2010 Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians will install a 250 kW solar array on their Rancheria. This will represent the most cost-effective, quickest, and most legitimate application of the theory in U.S. history. For comparison, there is the lone 750 kW wind turbine on Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, tens of millions of dollars in fraud, unceasing delays, and project legitimacy leant by the the DOE, EPA, DOD, U.N. and Al Gore's Inconvenient Truth.