RAEL Lunch Talk: Frances Natasha Sprei

Date: 
Wednesday, May 2, 2012 - 12:00am - 1:15pm

Please Join us in the Reading Room, accessible via 310 Barrows for a lunch talk by Frances Sprei.    Frances Sprei has a PhD in Energy and Environment from
Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. She has background in both
engineering physics (M. Sc.) and human ecology (Ba). Her areas of research are
end-use energy efficiency in residential buildings and personal transportation,
strategies for reducing carbon emissions from personal cars, interdisciplinary
trend analysis. In her thesis she studied in detail the interaction between
different car parameters and fuel consumption in new cars sold in Sweden from
1975 until today, with a focus on what share of technological development
resulted in actual lower fuel consumption. Her current research focuses on
policies and enablers of a transition to low carbon vehicles.

Frances
has been teaching both at undergraduate and graduate level in energy
efficiency, resource management, and principles of sustainable development. She
has held a number of public lectures to companies, organizations, and the
Swedish parliament. In 2011 she received the Jan-Eric Sundgren award for
valuable contributions to sustainable development. She is the co-chair of the
2012 Behavior, Energy and Climate Change Conference (BECC).

Swedish research group (Physical Resource Theory) and reducing carbon
emissions from the Swedish vehicle fleet

Abstract:

The first part of the presentation will be a short
introduction to the research group at Chalmers University of Technology in
Sweden, were I studied for my PhD. Physical Resource Theory has a similar
background to ERG, building from physics and moving into a more
interdisciplinary research of resource and climate constraints and solutions.

In the rest of my talk I will focus on my own research on vehicles
through three different studies:

First, in my thesis I studied in detail the interaction between
different car parameters and fuel consumption in new cars sold in Sweden from
1975 until today, with a focus on what share of technological development has
resulted in actual lower fuel consumption.

Second, a work in progress regarding the changes in the
market for flex-fuel cars in Sweden (mainly ethanol enabled). The aim of my
research is to explain the boom and crash development, by looking at policies
both at national and local level, but also the influence of media and the view
of ethanol as a sustainable fuel.

Third, I will briefly present the result from a report on
consumer incentives and EVs mainly in Europe.