Archive of Topic: Energy Modeling

Low Carbon Solutions for Sustainable Islands

The Sus­tain­able Islands group at RAEL is involved in under­stand­ing the scope for renew­able energy and energy effi­ciency in the Small Island Devel­op­ing State (SIDS) con­text. We are involved in a num­ber of projects that involve fea­si­bil­ity analy­sis, resource opti­miza­tion and energy sys­tem mod­el­ling. We con­duct assess­ments and build deci­sion sup­port tools for pol­icy mak­ers and indi­vid­u­als — to sup­port the build out of sus­tain­able, low car­bon island economies. Some of our past projects are listed here:

 

Energy Sec­tor Trends in the Caribbean

Pro­fes­sor Kam­men and grad­u­ate stu­dent Rebekah Shirley recently pub­lished an arti­cle on the his­tory of energy sec­tor devel­op­ment in the Caribbean. The paper also looks at a num­ber of cur­rent renew­able energy projects in the region, per­forms cost ben­e­fit analy­sis and dis­cusses oppor­tu­ni­ties for future renew­able pen­e­tra­tion in the region. Our work is high­lighted in Nature Cli­mate Change.

Shirley, R. and Kam­men, D. (2012). Renew­able energy sec­tor devel­op­ment in the Caribbean: Cur­rent trends and lessons from his­tory. Energy Pol­icy. Vol­ume 57, June 2013, Pages 244–252

 

Energy Effi­cient Low Income Hous­ing, French Polynesia

The RAEL Sus­tain­able Islands group was invited to col­lab­o­rate with researchers from the UC Berke­ley Gump Sta­tion in Moorea and the Poly­ne­sian Hous­ing Office to con­duct a inte­grated study on the sus­tain­abil­ity of low income hous­ing pro­to­types based on mate­ri­als and ther­mal per­for­mance. Our team con­tributed the car­bon foot­print assess­ment to this study. Check out the final report above.

 

Car­bon Foot­prints and Green-​​Job Poten­tial in the USVI

Pro­fes­sor Kam­men and grad­u­ate stu­dent Rebekah Shirley were invited to par­tic­i­pate in the NREL Energy Devel­op­ment in Island Nations Ini­tia­tive, launched in St. Thomas, USVI in 2010. Since then they have col­lab­o­rated with NREL and var­i­ous agen­cies in the ter­ri­tory to develop a house­hold car­bon cal­cu­la­tor and green jobs esti­ma­tor used as tools in pub­lic edu­ca­tion and deci­sion mak­ing. Kam­men and Shirley also col­lab­o­rated with NREL and the OAS to pre­pare a sur­vey of the sta­tus of Energy Pol­icy in var­i­ous Caribbean Islands.

Shirley, R., Jones, C. and Kam­men, D. (2012). A house­hold car­bon foot­print cal­cu­la­tor for islands: Case study of the United States Vir­gin Islands. Eco­log­i­cal Eco­nom­ics. Vol­ume 80, August 2012, Pages 8–14

U.S. DOE (2011). Energy Pol­icy and Sec­tor Analy­sis in the Caribbean 2010 — 2011.

Shirley, R. and Kam­men, D. (2012). Esti­mat­ing the Poten­tial Impact of Renew­able Energy on the Caribbean Job Sec­tor. RAEL Report 2012.1.

 

Green Jobs in Grenada

RAEL col­lab­o­rated with the UN Depart­ment of Eco­nomic and Social Affairs (DESA) on a road map for sus­tain­able eco­nomic growth in Grenada. Pro­fes­sor Kam­men and grad­u­ate stu­dent Rebekah Shirley pre­pared a chap­ter on green job poten­tial while ERG alumni Dan Prull pre­pared a chap­ter on future energy options. The report was pub­lished for the Rio +20 Sum­mit.

UN DESA (2012). Road Map on Build­ing a Green Econ­omy for Sus­tain­able Devel­op­ment in Car­ri­a­cou and Petite Mar­tinique, Grenada.

Arrechea Alvarado, Marlene Susana

Susana Arrechea holds a bach­e­lors degree in Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing from the Uni­ver­sity of San Car­los of Guatemala and a mas­ters degree in Mol­e­c­u­lar Nanoscience and Nan­otech­nol­ogy from the Uni­ver­sity of Castilla-​​La Man­cha. Susana is a Pro­fes­sor at the Engi­neer­ing Fac­ulty at the Uni­ver­sity San Car­los of Guatemala. In 2011, she began a doc­tor­ate pro­gram in Nanoscience and Nan­otech­nol­ogy at the Uni­ver­sity of Castilla-​​La Man­cha in Toledo, Spain. She received a schol­ar­ship through the Car­olina Foun­da­tion, the Uni­ver­sity of Castilla– La Man­cha and the Uni­ver­sity San Car­los of Guatemala. Susana inves­ti­gates novel mate­ri­als for third gen­er­a­tion solar cells at the Insti­tute of Nanoscience, Nan­otech­nol­ogy and Mol­e­c­u­lar Mate­ri­als at the Uni­ver­sity of Castilla – La Man­cha. In 2014, she was selected to par­tic­i­pate in the Renew­able Energy group of Ful­bright Regional Net­work for Applied Research (NEXUS) Pro­gram, led by Dr. Daniel M Kam­men and Dr. Ser­gio Pacca. This pro­gram bring together a net­work of researchers from the United States, Brazil and other West­ern Hemi­sphere nations, for a series of sem­i­nar meet­ings and mul­ti­dis­ci­pli­nary research. Susana will visit the Renew­able and Appro­pri­ate Energy Lab­o­ra­tory (RAEL) at the Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia, Berke­ley, to study­ing sus­tain­able iso­lated micro­grids in Latin Amer­ica as part of the Ful­bright NEXUS exchange experience.

He, Gang

Gang He is now an Assis­tant Pro­fes­sor in the
Stony Brook University
E-​​mail: Gang.He [at] stony​brook​.edu
While a doc­toral stu­dent in RAEL and ERG, Gang He was also a Vis­it­ing Fac­ulty Affil­i­ate for the China Energy Group, Energy Tech­nolo­gies Area, at Lawrence Berke­ley National Lab­o­ra­tory, as well as an Assis­tant Pro­fes­sor in the Depart­ment of Tech­nol­ogy and Soci­ety, at Stony Brook Uni­ver­sity. He has worked with the China Energy Group since 2011. His work focuses on energy mod­el­ing, energy eco­nom­ics, energy and cli­mate pol­icy, energy and envi­ron­ment, domes­tic coal and power sec­tors and their key role in both the global energy sup­ply and in inter­na­tional cli­mate pol­icy frame­work. He also stud­ies other inter­dis­ci­pli­nary aspects of global cli­mate change and the devel­op­ment of lower-​​carbon energy sources.

Prior to Berke­ley, he was a research asso­ciate with Stan­ford University’s Pro­gram on Energy and Sus­tain­able Devel­op­ment from 2008 to 2010.

Deborah Sunter

Join­ing RAEL in Octo­ber 2015:

Dr. Deb­o­rah A. Sunter is cur­rently a AAAS Sci­ence and Tech­nol­ogy Pol­icy Fel­low at the Depart­ment of Energy: Advanced Man­u­fac­tur­ing Office. Her cur­rent inter­ests include renew­able energy sys­tems, advanced man­u­fac­tur­ing tech­niques, and the inter­ac­tion of sci­ence and pol­icy in acad­e­mia, indus­try and government.

She received a B.S in Mechan­i­cal and Aero­space Engi­neer­ing at Cor­nell Uni­ver­sity. There she devel­oped a nanosatel­lite mis­sion that was suc­cess­fully launched into orbit. Although fas­ci­nated by aero­space appli­ca­tions, the time-​​critical issue of global warm­ing shifted her focus in grad­u­ate school to explore renew­able energy. Spe­cial­iz­ing in com­pu­ta­tional mod­el­ing of thermo-​​physics in mul­ti­phase sys­tems, she devel­oped a novel solar absorber tube and received her Ph.D. in Mechan­i­cal Engi­neer­ing at the Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia, Berke­ley. The need for a global envi­ron­men­tal solu­tion led her to do research abroad in both Japan and China.

Dr. Sunter’s JHU email is dsunter1​@​jhu.​edu. She teaches 425.625 Solar Energy: Sci­ence, Tech­nol­ogy and Pol­icy.

Bolliger, Ian

Ian is a National Defense Sci­ence and Engi­neer­ing Grad­u­ate Fel­low in the Energy and Resources Group and a mem­ber of the inau­gural “Envi­ron­ment and Soci­ety: Data Sci­ence for the 21st Cen­tury” National Sci­ence Foun­da­tion Research Trainee­ship (NRT) cohort. His research inter­ests lie at the inter­sec­tion of energy sys­tems, cli­mate change adap­ta­tion, and global health. He is a mem­ber of the Next Gen­er­a­tion Ecosys­tem Exper­i­ments Arc­tic team, inves­ti­gat­ing bio­geo­chem­i­cal fac­tors gov­ern­ing energy fluxes in arc­tic tun­dra envi­ron­ments from the plant scale to the model grid-​​cell scale. He is also inter­ested in devel­op­ing bet­ter tools for char­ac­ter­iz­ing sea­sonal snow­pack vari­a­tion, in order to improve fore­casts of stream­flow, water avail­abil­ity, and hydropower pro­duc­tion. Ian serves as project man­ager for Tiny House in My Back­yard, a stu­dent project to design and build mobile, afford­able, and sus­tain­able net-​​zero energy hous­ing on the Berke­ley Global Cam­pus. Prior to arriv­ing at UC Berke­ley, he received his BA from Har­vard Uni­ver­sity in Applied Math­e­mat­ics and spent three years mod­el­ing trends in global injury rates at the Insti­tute for Health Met­rics and Eval­u­a­tion. Out­side of acad­e­mia, Ian is a mem­ber of the Tahoe Back­coun­try Ski Patrol, and he writes about moun­tain adven­tures and envi­ron­men­tal issues on his blog at TheIn​er​tia​.com.

Clean Energy Solutions for Borneo

Rapid eco­nomic growth sus­tained in South­east Asia through­out the new mil­len­nium has led to a surge in large-​​scale infra­struc­ture projects to facil­i­tate indus­trial pro­duc­tiv­ity and con­sump­tion. The state of Sarawak, located along the north­ern coast of the island of Bor­neo, is the poor­est and most rural state in Malaysia but has long been a focal point for the devel­op­ment of large-​​scale hydro­elec­tric power. At least six dams are sched­uled to be com­pleted in Sarawak by 2020 as part of a high hydro-​​potential cor­ri­dor in cen­tral Sarawak. These forests have undis­puted global and local sig­nif­i­cance eco­log­i­cally, bio­log­i­cally and culturally.

In col­lab­o­ra­tion with local grass-​​roots renew­able project devel­op­ers and river pro­tec­tion groups we have explored the poten­tial for clean energy alter­na­tives in the state through an inte­gra­tion of mod­el­ing tools: (a) mod­el­ing long-​​term util­ity scale elec­tric­ity gen­er­a­tion alter­na­tives in East Malaysia to deter­mine trade-​​offs across dif­fer­ent tech­nolo­gies; (b) explor­ing the poten­tial for rural com­mu­ni­ties in dam-​​affected areas to sat­isfy energy access needs using local resources; © demon­strat­ing a rapid assess­ment method for esti­mat­ing the impact of mega-​​projects on bio­di­ver­sity. Each of these stud­ies pro­vides infor­ma­tion use­ful to the dis­cus­sion of alter­na­tives and fur­thers the analy­sis of green econ­omy costs and ben­e­fits. Our pub­lished find­ings have influ­enced pol­icy dis­cus­sions at the Min­is­te­r­ial level and a mora­to­rium against the Baram Dam was announced in 2015.

 

Media cov­er­age of our research and the Baram Dam Moratorium: 

The Bor­neo Project, March 21, 2016 — Fan­tas­tic new video on “Devel­op­ment with­out destruc­tion” in Sarawak.

Mongabay, Octo­ber 20, 2015 — Indige­nous anti-​​dam activists con­verge in Sarawak from around the globe

Sarawak Report, Sep­tem­ber 25, 2015 — BMF Press State­ment: Vic­tory, Mora­to­rium on the Baram Dam in Malaysia

The Bor­neo Post, Sep­tem­ber 27, 2015 — Small is Beau­ti­ful: The Peo­ple Matter

 

Media cov­er­age of our June 28, 2015 press con­fer­ence in Kuch­ing, Sarawak:

The Bor­neo Post, August 11, 2015 - Ade­nan wants SEB to light up the rural areas

The Malaysian Insider, July 31, 2015 - Ade­nan puts Baram dam on hold, agrees to lis­ten to natives’ grouses

Radio Free Sarawak, July 15, 2015 - “Sjotveit should be out”, say Sarawakians

The Malaysian Insider, July 14, 2015 - Stop Baleh dam ten­der until envi­ron­men­tal study scru­ti­nised, says Sarawak PKR

Mongabay​.com, July 8, 2015 - Sarawak can meet energy needs with­out mega-​​dams: report

BFM 89.9 — The Busi­ness Sta­tion (www​.bfm​.my), Radio and online inter­view, July 3, 2015, Clean energy options in East Malaysia

The Daily Express — East Malaysia, June 30, 2015 - Sarawak Mega Dam Project Study

The Bor­neo Post, June 29, 2015 - Bor­neo May See the End of Mega-​​Dams

The Malaysian Insider, June 29, 2015 - Activists say Ade­nan rethink­ing mega dams pol­icy in Sarawak

Free Malaysia Today, June 29, 2015 - Ade­nan May Drop Mega Dam Projects

The May­lay Mail, June 29, 2015 - CM pulls the brakes on Baram dam until he goes through detailed stud­ies, group claims

Inter­na­tional Rivers (2014). Bet­ter Solu­tions Than Megadams for Pow­er­ing Sarawak, Study Finds. World Rivers Review Vol 29. No 2. Page 5.

Ear­lier media cov­er­age of this work on energy alter­na­tives to coal and mega-​​hydropower projects includes this report in TIME Mag­a­zine:

Feb­ru­ary 22, 2011 — Bor­neo says no to dirty energy

Recent dis­cus­sions of the rela­tion­ship between mega-​​dams and earth­quakes has also been receiv­ing local cov­er­age in Bor­neo: http://​www​.the​bor​neo​post​.com/​2​0​1​5​/​0​6​/​2​8​/​d​a​m​s​-​f​a​u​l​t​-​l​i​n​e​s​-​a​n​d​-​q​u​a​k​es/

Lipman, Timothy

Tim­o­thy E. Lip­man is an energy and envi­ron­men­tal tech­nol­ogy, eco­nom­ics, and pol­icy researcher and lec­turer with the Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia — Berke­ley. He is serv­ing as Co-​​Director for the cam­pus’ Trans­porta­tion Sus­tain­abil­ity Research Cen­ter (TSRC), based at the Insti­tute of Trans­porta­tion Stud­ies, and also as Direc­tor of the U.S. Depart­ment of Energy Pacific Region Clean Energy Appli­ca­tion Cen­ter (PCEAC). Tim’s research focuses on electric-​​drive vehi­cles, fuel cell tech­nol­ogy, com­bined heat and power sys­tems, bio­fu­els, renew­able energy, and elec­tric­ity and hydro­gen energy sys­tems infrastructure.

Lip­man received his Ph.D. degree in Envi­ron­men­tal Pol­icy Analy­sis with the Grad­u­ate Group in Ecol­ogy at UC Davis (1999). He also has received an M.S. degree in the tech­nol­ogy track of the Grad­u­ate Group in Trans­porta­tion Tech­nol­ogy and Pol­icy, also at UC Davis (1998), and a B.A. from Stan­ford Uni­ver­sity (1990). His Ph.D. dis­ser­ta­tion titled “Zero-​​Emission Vehi­cle Sce­nario Cost Analy­sis Using A Fuzzy Set-​​Based Frame­work” received the Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia Trans­porta­tion Center’s ‘Char­lie Wootan’ Ph.D. dis­ser­ta­tion award for 1999. He is also a 2005 Cli­mate Change Fel­low with the Woods Insti­tute at Stan­ford Uni­ver­sity, and he also received a 2004 Insti­tute of Trans­porta­tion Engi­neers ser­vice award, a 1998 NSF IGERT teach­ing fel­low­ship, a 1997 Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia Trans­porta­tion Cen­ter Dis­ser­ta­tion Grant, a 1996 ENO Foun­da­tion Fel­low­ship, a 1995 Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia Trans­porta­tion Cen­ter Dis­ser­ta­tion Grant, and a 1994 Chevron Foun­da­tion Fel­low­ship. A native of Golden, Col­orado, he grad­u­ated Cum Laude from Col­orado Acad­emy in 1986.

Cruetzig , Felix

Dr. Felix Creutzig is head of the work­ing group Land Use, Infra­struc­tures and Trans­port. He is lead author of the IPCC’s Fifth Assess­ment Report and was lead ana­lyst of the Global Energy Assess­ment. Felix Creutzig teaches courses about cli­mate change and infra­struc­tures at Tech­nis­che Uni­ver­sität Berlin. His research focuses on:

•    Con­cep­tu­al­iz­ing and quan­ti­fy­ing GHG emis­sions of cities world-​​wide
•    Assess­ing oppor­tu­ni­ties for GHG mit­i­ga­tion of cities world-​​wide
•    Build­ing mod­els of sus­tain­able urban form and trans­port
•    Land rents as a com­ple­ment for financ­ing sus­tain­able infra­struc­tures
•    Ana­lyz­ing the role of cap­i­tal stocks and infra­struc­tures for cli­mate change mit­i­ga­tion
•    Land use-​​mediated uncer­tainty in inte­grated assess­ments, par­tic­u­larly those related to bioenergy

Since 2009 Felix Creutzig is also group leader at the Depart­ment of the Eco­nom­ics of Cli­mate Change at Tech­nis­che Uni­ver­sität Berlin.  He was a post­doc fel­low at the Energy and Resources Group at the Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia, Berke­ley, col­lab­o­rat­ing with Dan Kam­men, Lee Schip­per and Eliz­a­beth Deakin, and the Energy Foun­da­tion China in Bei­jing. Felix Creutzig received his PhD in Com­pu­ta­tional Neu­ro­science from Humboldt-​​Universität zu Berlin, and holds a Mas­ter of Advanced Stud­ies (Path III in Math­e­mat­ics) from Cam­bridge Uni­ver­sity, UK.

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Phone: (510) 642-1640
Fax: (510) 642-1085
Email: ergdeskb@berkeley.edu


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